Section H6 Solid waste storage

  1. The Requirement
    1. Guidance
      1. Appendix H6-A: Relevant waste collection legislation

    The Requirement

    Requirement Solid waste storage H6. (1) Adequate provision shall be made for storage of solid waste.

    (2) Adequate means of access shall be provided:

    (a) for people in the building to the place of storage; and

    (b) from the place of storage to a collection point (where one has been specified by the waste collection authority under Section 46 (household waste) or Section 47 (commercial waste) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 (a) or to a street (where no collection point has been specified).

    Limits on application  

    Guidance

    Performance In the Secretary of State’s view the requirements of H6 will be met if the solid waste storage is: a. designed and sited so as not to be prejudicial to health or local amenity; b. of sufficient area having regard to the requirements of the waste collection authority for the number and size of receptacles under Sections 46 and 47 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990; c. sited so as to be accessible for use by people in the building and of ready access for removal to the collection point specified by the waste collection authority under Sections 46 and 47 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990. Introduction to provisions 1.1 The efficacy of a refuse storage system is dependent on its capacity and the ease of removal in relation to the collection service provided by the waste collection authority. 1.2 The waste collection authority has powers under Section 46 (Receptacles for household waste) and Section 47 (Receptacles for commercial or industrial waste) to specify the type and number of receptacles to be used and the location where the waste should be placed for collection. Consultation should take place with the waste collection authority to determine their requirements. 1.3 H6 applies to the erection or extension of a building and to all material changes of use described in Regulation 5. Domestic developments Capacity 1.1 For domestic developments space should be provided for storage of containers for separated waste (i.e. waste which can be recycled is stored separately from waste which cannot) with a combined capacity of 0.25m³ per dwelling or such other capacity as may be agreed with the waste collection authority. Where collections are less frequent than once per week, this allowance should be increased accordingly. 1.2 Low rise domestic developments – In low rise domestic developments (houses, bungalows and flats up to 4th floor) any dwelling should have, or have access to, a location where at least two movable individual or communal waste containers, meeting the requirements of the waste collection authority, can be stored. 1.3 Where separate storage areas are provided for each dwelling, an area of 1.2m x 1.2m should be sufficient to provide for storage of waste containers and provide space for access. 1.4 Where communal storage areas are provided space requirements should be determined in consultation with the waste collection authority. 1.5 High rise domestic developments – in multi-storey domestic developments dwellings up to the 4th floor may each have their own waste container or may share a waste container. 1.6 Dwellings above the 4th storey may share a single waste container for non-recyclable waste fed by chute, with separate storage for any waste which can be recycled. Alternatively storage compounds or rooms should be provided. In such a case a satisfactory management arrangement for conveying refuse to the storage area should be assured. 1.7 The use of ‘Residents Only’ recycling centres (areas where residents may bring their recyclable waste for storage in large containers, e.g. bottle banks) in large blocks has been found to be effective in some areas. Siting 1.8 Storage areas for waste containers and chutes should be sited so that the distance householders are required to carry refuse does not usually exceed 30m (excluding any vertical distance). Containers should be within 25m of the waste collection point specified by the waste collection authority. 1.9 The location for storage of waste containers should be sited so that, unless it is completely unavoidable, the containers can be taken to the collection point without being taken through a building, unless it is a porch or garage, or a car port or other open covered space (this provision applies only to new buildings except that extensions or conversions should not remove such a facility where one already exists). 1.10 For waste containers up to 250 litres, steps should be avoided between the container store and collection point wherever possible and should not exceed 3 in number. Slopes should not exceed 1:12. Exceptionally this may be exceeded provided that the lengths are not excessive and it is not part of a series of slopes. (See also Approved Document K1 Section 2.) For storage areas where larger containers are to be used steps should be avoided. Where this is not otherwise possible, the storage area should be relocated. 1.11 The collection point should be reasonably accessible to the size of waste collection vehicles typically used by the waste collection authority. 1.12 External storage areas for waste containers should be away from windows and ventilators and preferably be in shade or under shelter. Storage areas should not interfere with pedestrian or vehicle access to buildings. Design 1.13 Unsightly bins can damage the visual amenity of an area and contribute to increased levels of anti-social nuisance such as odour and litter, so bin storage should be planned carefully. Where the location for storage is in a publicly accessible area or in an open area around a building (e.g. in a front garden) an enclosure or shelter should be considered. Best practice guidance is given in NHBC Foundation report NF60. 1.14 Where enclosures, compounds or storage rooms are provided they should allow room for filling and emptying and provide a clear space of 150mm between and around the containers. Enclosures, compounds or storage rooms for communal containers should be a minimum of 2m high. Enclosures for individual containers should be sufficiently high to allow the lid to be opened for filling. The enclosure should be permanently ventilated at the top and bottom and should have a paved impervious floor. 1.15 Communal storage areas should have provision for washing down and draining the floor into a system suitable for receiving a polluted effluent. Gullies should incorporate a trap which maintains a seal even during prolonged periods of disuse. 1.16 Any room for the open storage of waste should be secure to prevent access by vermin. Any compound for the storage of waste should be secure to prevent access by vermin unless the waste is to be stored in secure containers with close fitting lids. 1.17 Where storage rooms are provided, separate rooms should be provided for the storage of waste which cannot be recycled, and waste which can be recycled. 1.18 High-rise domestic developments – where chutes are provided they should be at least 450mm diameter and should have a smooth non-absorbent surface and close fitting access doors at each storey which has a dwelling and be ventilated at the top and bottom. Non-domestic developments 1.19 In other types of development, and particularly where special problems such as high density developments influence the provision of a system, it is essential that the waste collection authority is consulted for guidance on resolving the following points.

    a. The volume and nature of the waste and the storage capacity required, based on the frequency of collection and the size and type of waste container.

    b. Any requirements for segregation of waste which can be recycled.

    c. The method of waste storage, including any on-site treatment proposed, related to the intended layout and building density.

    d. The location of waste storage areas, waste treatment areas and waste collection points and the access to these locations for operatives and vehicles.

    e. Hygiene arrangements in the waste storage and waste treatment areas.

    f. Fire hazards and protection measures.

    1.20 Waste storage areas should have an impervious floor and should have provision for washing down and draining the floor into a system suitable for receiving a polluted effluent. Gullies should incorporate a trap which maintains a seal even during prolonged periods of disuse. 1.21 Any room for the open storage of waste should be secure to prevent access by vermin. Any compound for the storage of waste should be secure to prevent access by vermin unless the waste is to be stored in secure containers with close fitting lids. 1.22 Waste storage areas should be marked and signs should be provided. Alternative approach 1.23 Recommendations and data on these items can be found in BS 5906:2005 Code of practice for waste management in buildings.    

    Appendix H6-A: Relevant waste collection legislation

    Collection of household waste A.1 Under Section 45 (Collection of controlled waste) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990, local authorities have a general duty to collect household waste within their area without charge. A.2 Under Section 46 (Receptacles for household waste) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990, the local authority may require: a. waste of certain types to be stored separately so that it can be recycled; b. occupiers of dwellings to provide containers of a specified type for storage of waste; c. additional containers to be provided for separate storage of recyclable waste; d. locations where containers should be placed for emptying. Collection of commercial and industrial waste A.3 Under Section 45 (Collection of controlled waste) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990, local authorities may also have a duty to collect commercial waste within their area where requested and they may also collect industrial waste. A charge may be levied for such services. A.4 Under Section 47 (Receptacles for commercial or industrial waste) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990, the local authority may still require: a. waste of certain types to be stored separately so that it can be recycled; b. occupiers to provide containers of a specified type for storage of waste; c. additional containers to be provided for separate storage of recyclable waste; d. locations where containers should be placed for emptying. Access for removal of waste to be maintained A.5 Under Section 23 (Provision of facilities for refuse) subsection (3) of the Building Act 1984, it is unlawful to obstruct the access (such as those specified in Requirement H6 of the Building Regulations) provided for removal of waste without the consent of the local authority. In giving their consent, the local authority may specify conditions regarding the provision of an alternative means of access for removal of refuse.

    • Diagram 1 Direct connection of ground Floor WC to a drain Part H1 Diagram 1 Direct connection of ground Floor WC to a drain Part H1
    • Diagram 2 Branch connection to stacks- crossflow prevention Part H Diagram 2 Branch connection to stacks- crossflow prevention Part H
    • Diagram 3 Branch Connections Part H Diagram 3 Branch Connections Part H1
    • Diagram 4 Branch ventilation pipes part H1 Diagram 4 Branch ventilation pipes part H1
    • Diagram 5 Stub stack Part H1 Diagram 5 Stub stack Part H1
    • Diagram 6 Termination of ventilation stacks or ventilation part of discharge Part H1 Diagram 6 Termination of ventilation stacks or ventilation part of discharge Part H1
    • Diagram 7 Pipes Penetrating walls Part H2 Diagram 7 Pipes Penetrating walls Part H1
    • Diagram 8 Pipe runs near buildings Part H2 Diagram 8 Pipe runs near buildings Part H1
    • Diagram 9 Discharge capacities of foul drains running 0.75 proportional depth Part H Diagram 9 Discharge capacities of foul drains running 0.75 proportional depth Part H1
    • Diagram 10 Bedding for pipes Part H Diagram 10 Bedding for pipes Part H1
    • Diagram 11 Protection for pipes laid in shallow depths (minimum sizes) Part H Diagram 11 Protection for pipes laid in shallow depths (minimum sizes) Part H1
    • Diagram 12 Joints for concrete encased pipes(minimum sizes) Part H Diagram 12 Joints for concrete encased pipes(minimum sizes) Part H1
    • Diagram 1 Drainage Field H2 Diagram 1 Drainage Field H2
    • Diagram 2 Drainage mound Part H2 Diagram 2 Drainage mound Part H2
    • Diagram 3 Typical horizontal flow reed bed treatment system Part H2 Diagram 3 Typical horizontal flow reed bed treatment system Part H2
    • Diagram 4 Typical flow reed bed treatment system Part H2 Diagram 4 Typical flow reed bed treatment system Part H2
    • Diagram 1 Rainfall intensities for design of gutter and rainfall pipes (litres per second per square metre) Part H3 Diagram 1 Rainfall intensities for design of gutter and rainfall pipes (litres per second per square metre) Part H3
    • Diagram 2 Rainfall intensities for design of drainage from paved areas and underground rainwater drainage (litres per second per square metre) Part H3 Diagram 2 Rainfall intensities for design of drainage from paved areas and underground rainwater drainage (litres per second per square metre) Part H3
    • Diagram 3 Discharge capacities of rainwater drains running full Part H3 Diagram 3 Discharge capacities of rainwater drains running full Part H3
    • Table 1 Minimum trap sizes and seal depths Part H1 Table 1 Minimum trap sizes and seal depths Part H1
    • Table 2 Common branch discharge pipes unventilated Part H Table 2 Common branch discharge pipes unventilated Part H1
    • Table 3 Minimum Diameters for discharge stacks Part H Table 3 Minimum Diameters for discharge stacks Part H1
    • Table 4 Materials for sanitary pipework Part H Table 4 Materials for sanitary pipework Part H1
    • Table 5 Flow rates from dwellings Part H Table 5 Flow rates from dwellings Part H1
    • Table 6 Recommended minimum gradients for foul drains Part H Table 6 Recommended minimum gradients for foul drains Part H1
    • Table 7 Materials for below ground gravity drainage Part H1 Table 7 Materials for below ground gravity drainage Part H1
    • Table 8 Limits of cover for class 120 clayware pipes in any width of trench Part H Table 8 Limits of cover for class 120 clayware pipes in any width of trench Part H1
    • Table 9 Limits of cover for class M concrete pipes in any width of trench Part H Table 9 Limits of cover for class M concrete pipes in any width of trench Part H1
    • Table 10 Limits of cover for thermoplastic (nominal ring stiffness SN4) pipes in any width of trench Part H Table 10 Limits of cover for thermoplastic (nominal ring stiffness SN4) pipes in any width of trench Part H1
    • Table 11 Minimum dimensions for access fittings and inspection chambers Part H Table 11 Minimum dimensions for access fittings and inspection chambers Part H1
    • Table 12 Minimum dimensions for manholes Part H Table 12 Minimum dimensions for manholes Part H1
    • Table 13 Maximum spacing for access points in metres Part H1 Table 13 Maximum spacing for access points in metres Part H1
    • Table 14 Materials for access points Part H1 Table 14 Materials for access points Part H1
    • Table A1 Flow rates from dwellings Part H Table A1 Flow rates from dwellings Appendix H1
    • Table A2 Flow rates from appliances Part H Table A2 Flow rates from appliances Appendix H1
    • Table A3 Minimum trap sizes and seal depths additional to Table 2 Part H Table A3 Minimum trap sizes and seal depths additional to Table 2 Appendix H1
    • Table C1 Characteristics that should be considered when designing or laying a shared drain:sewer so that it meets the basic requirements for adoption Part H Table C1 Characteristics that should be considered when designing or laying a shared drain:sewer so that it meets the basic requirements for adoption Appendix H1
    • Table 1 Calculation of drained area Part H Table 1 Calculation of drained area Part H3
    • Table 2 Gutter sizes and outlet sizes Part H Table 2 Gutter sizes and outlet sizes Part H3